WELCOME TO THE CENTER FOR INTEGRATED FUNGAL RESEARCH

The goal of the Center for Integrated Fungal Research (CIFR) is to integrate all aspects of fungal research including environmental and climate initiatives, disease, agriculture, evolution, mathematical modeling, genomics and bioinformatics, and to translate knowledge from fundamental research to stakeholders, the general public, and the scientific community.  CIFR will promote education and understanding of the relative contribution of global biodiversity to the beneficial and deleterious activities of fungi.

Recent News

Congratulations to Marc Cubeta who is serving as the 89th president of the Mycological Society of America!  The announcement can be found HERE.

Ralph Dean has a new partnership with SAS and Microsoft, through the Plant Sciences Initiative (PSI) to develop small sensors that can perceive volatile organic compounds and detect plant diseases.  Read more about this exciting collaboration HERE.

Congratulations to Christine Hawks for receiving a $1.4M grant from NSF to study the effect of droughts on soil microbes. The announcement can be found in CALS news.

Congratulations to Kevin Garcia for receiving a $740,000 grant from the USDA to study how symbiotic root fungi help legumes get potassium.  The announcement can be found in CALS news.

Congratulations to Francis de los Reyes who was awarded a 2020 Patents for Humanity Award by the US Patents and Trademark Office for his Flexcrevator project.  The Flexcrevator is a machine that enables fast, safe, and hygienic fecal sludge removal, surpassing manual emptying.  The announcement can be found HERE.

Marc Cubeta was featured on the local news (CBS17): “Fungus among us: Why are mushrooms taking over central NC lawns?”.  The video version can be found HERE.

The CAST article on “Agriculture and the Microbiome” by Ignazio Carbone, Megan Andrews and Owen Duckworth was featured in WRAL TechWire and CALS news.  The link to the publication and the webinar (presented by Ignazio and Megan) can be found HERE.

Congratulations to Manuel Kleiner on receiving a $1.8M NIH grant to study the gut microbiome!  The announcement can be found HERE.